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  • in reply to: National Science Foundation (NSF) #5684
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Hi nebr384! If you are working with an academic collaborator on your proposal, it is usually more economical to obtain IRB review/approval via that institution (though it is not always a speedy process). If you do not have an academic partner or are not able to make use of their IRB, you can seek out a commercial Institutional Review Board to review your protocol. A quick web search for “commercial IRBs” will help you find lists of companies that offer these services. You’ll see that many universities have recommended commercial IRBs listed on their websites, which can help you identify reputable service providers.

    in reply to: National Science Foundation (NSF) #5168
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Hello, nebr384, and thank you for reaching out with your question. We can appreciate how difficult this must be! We suggest reaching out to other Program Directors at NSF to inquire about the status of your proposal. You could do so tactfully, stating that you are concerned that you haven’t heard anything and wanted to make sure everything is okay with the PD.

    We’d also like to note that we have had clients experience similar delays, and with continued follow-up to the PD, ultimately receive their award. However, in some cases this has taken 12 months from time of submission. We wish you luck and hope you receive a response soon!

    in reply to: National Science Foundation (NSF) #2535
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Hi Shoba,

    No, NSF only offers TABA for active Phase II SBIR/STTR awards at this time (see item #3 here for details).

    Please let us know if you have any additional questions!

    Best,
    Lindsay

    in reply to: Consultants and BioSketch Format #1914
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Hi dtx1,

    Yes, you should also use the NSF-approved format for consultants and other senior personnel. Note that if you do not wish you use the NSF’s fillable biosketch PDF template, you have the option to upload the partially completed NSF version in addition to a resume that meets NSF’s specifications. Please refer to section C.5. of the solicitation for detailed instructions. This link also provides helpful guidance on biosketch preparation. Please also note that consultant biosketches should be uploaded as part of the Budget Justification.

    Please let us know if you have any additional questions!

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by lindsay@EGC.
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Thank you for reaching out with your question! The page limit for the Project Description portion of an NSF Phase I SBIR/STTR application is 15 pages (and 9 pages minimum). The references and other supporting documents are not included in this page limit. You can find more details in the SBIR and STTR solicitations. Please let us know if you have additional questions!

    in reply to: National Science Foundation (NSF) #1024
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Hello! Thank you for posting your questions. 

    1) For NSF, the Phase I SBIR budget cap is $256,000 for Phase I and $1,000,000 for Phase II. These are hard caps, and NSF does not offer budget waivers (as is the case for NIH). 
    For NIH, the Phase I SBIR budget cap is $256,580 for Phase I and $1,710,531 for Phase II. However, NIH applicants may be eligible for additional funding if their project aligns with a published budget waiver topic. Refer to this document for Institute-specific information on budget waiver limits. The budget waiver topics are included in the appendix, or can be viewed separately here. We recommend conferring with an NIH Program Officer to confirm whether your project aligns with a budget waiver topic. 

    2) Both NSF and NIH fund biomedical/health projects through the SBIR program, but NSF does not support drug development and they generally do not support clinical trials, clinical validation of information technologies or medical devices, or studies performed primarily for regulatory purposes. Limited studies with human subjects may be acceptable to the extent that they are performed with the goal of establishing feasibility of early-stage technologies. If you have difficulty determining whether your technology aligns best with NIH or NSF, we recommend reaching out to a Program Officer/Director to discuss your technology and scope of work.

    Please feel free to reach out if you’d like additional clarification!

    in reply to: HHS/NIH #699
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Hello, Hua!

    The PI for your small business would not need to provide a letter of support. However, if you have a subaward, the subaward PI would provide a letter of support describing their willingness to participate and their role in your project.

    I hope this helps! Let us know if you have additional questions.

    in reply to: Impact of coronavirus on deadlines? #606
    lindsay@EGC
    Moderator

    Here is a helpful resource on the Eva Garland Consulting website with compiled guidelines for late applications from different government agencies: https://www.evagarland.com/policies-for-late-grant-applications-affected-by-covid-19/

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)